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Posts Tagged ‘benefits of Twitter’

As often happens when reading the post of another, I found myself considering, thinking, reflecting and inevitably weighing up the pros and cons of arguments being presented.

The post “What if school was more like Twitter?” by ASCD Edge: A professional networking community for Educators, presents an interesting discussion on the value of Twitter to educators.   As the positive attributes of Twitter are listed, the author contemplates how the ‘Twitter benefit’ could be duplicated in a school which uses traditional ‘communication’ methods such as school bulletins, email, faculty and full staff meetings.

It is not my intention to duplicate this discussion here, but consideration of just the positive attributes of Twitter listed in this article makes for powerful reading and thinking.

  1. A bulk of the information exchange available on Twitter for instance comes in the form of links, or URL’s.
  2. (Twitter provides the opportunity) to respond to ideas and have a general discussion about those responses.
  3. Reflection is very big on Twitter.  Many tweets cause people to discuss and reflect.
  4. Twitter offers a great deal of variety in opinion.  An obviously unique element to this is the fact that Twitter is a global effort.
  5. A big, big Twitter plus is the access educators have to education experts. Conversations are had between regular teachers and education luminaries on a daily basis.
  6. Twitter is a gateway to many free online webinars and online conferences.
  7. On Twitter there are constant discussions and references to pedagogy and methodology in education.

Sadly, the author of this post concludes:

“The idea of using technology as a tool for professional development has not caught on.  The idea of being a “Connected Educator” is too foreign to too many educators. “

For those of us already hooked on Twitter, there is no need to be convinced of the power of Twitter as a tool to share, to learn, to reflect and connect with educators worldwide.   Just recently, when presenting to a group of uninitiated teachers, I saw the surprise on their faces when I told them that I use Twitter only for professional purposes.   Even more surprise seemed to drift around the room when I told them that my day is not complete unless I check my Twitter account.

Why is it that efforts to convince fellow teachers to give Twitter a go is often met with either disinterest or disdain?   Why is it that our colleagues say they have insufficient time to reach out and explore?  Why is that trying to garner interest in this powerful tool is such an uphill battle?

Good questions perhaps.  Unfortunately, I don’t have good answers.

All I do know is that each and every day, through Twitter, my interest is piqued and my knowledge is extended by the many interesting and powerful tweets I read.  My wish is that all educators join this global community and that together we hold hands to advance our profession.

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