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Archive for the ‘Personal Growth’ Category

I first heard about Sharism a few years ago.  After reading about it and taking some time to ponder a little more about it’s benefits, I did what often happens with good ideas – I forgot about it!   At the time, I put off taking decisive action to either share my thoughts here or to more actively implement its philosophy!

Then I listened to Mark Zuckerberg’s 2017 Harvard Commencement Speech a couple of weeks ago, and I remembered the notion of Sharism and could see that what Zuckerberg suggests be done on a grand scale is somewhat similar to Sharism.

So what is Sharism?

Sharism is a term for the motivation and philosophy behind the collaborative building of value that results from sharing content and ideas

or ….. in other words

The more you give, the more you get. The more you share, the more you are shared.

And what struck me was the notion of ‘building community’ which Zuckerberg noted in his speech to this year’s Harvard graduates.  Identifying the divisive nature of society segregated by race, religion and country of birth, Zuckerberg paused to question his audience to confirm the fact that millennials, connected to each other as they are by social media, are ‘citizens of the world’ who relate to each other in a deep and meaningful manner, a process which did not exist prior to the advent of social media.

Social media is a tool by which Sharism can so easily be implemented:

  • just a click shares news, thoughts and emotions around the world within seconds
  • networks of like minded people can be created
  • individuals can locate and tap into existing networks
  • individuals can be empowered enabling just one person to truly make a difference
  • sharing enables continued sharing in a speedy and powerful way

Indeed – social media is a gift that has altered our world in profound and significant ways.

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UN agency ranks Australia 39 out of 41 countries for quality education

Newspaper headlines like this Sydney Morning Herald headline just two days ago, is both demoralizing and disturbing.

The League Table of country performance of nine child-related goals is a serious concern, one which many a school, its administration, principals and teachers along with parents will no doubt be questioning.

Is it just lack of money being put into education?

Is it teaching standards?

Is it ill planned curriculum?

Is the curriculum too cluttered?

Just what is behind the continual slide of Australian standards, achievements and quality of education?

While answers to these questions will continue to be hotly debated, a new theory was thrown my way just yesterday:

Australians as a whole don’t value education!

Could there be any truth to this? Could attitude or lack of positive attitude to the value of education be the stumbling block to attaining quality education?

Let’s be honest here.  Despite hours of preparation, attention to detail, provision of challenging resources and superbly equipped classrooms, we’ve all had those lessons that just fall flat.  The students don’t engage with us, each other or the subject matter.  Leaving the classroom at the end of the lesson, we feel frustrated and miserable.  The most in depth analysis just can’t identify anything we, as the teacher, could have done differently.

Could it be that student lack of interest is real and is pervading not just our classroom, but the entire school and society?

Is it time perhaps, for us to be having conversations about our collective attitude to education? To be talking up achievement, the value of education and the big picture of how Australia’s future economic and business success is dependent on a well educated population?

This is a hot potato.  A very hot potato!

Even the most remote thought that our schools are populated with children who don’t give a hoot about what they are being taught or what they are learning is a very scary prospect!

 

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Just two weeks ago, Mark Zuckerberg gave the 2017 Harvard Commencement Speech.

In short, his words are sensational!

Addressing his fellow millennials, Zukerberg words are both moving and powerful as he implores the graduating class of 2017 to take up the challenge to not just create meaning and purpose in their own lives, but to create meaning and purpose in the lives of their fellow human beings and in this way to create a better and more just world.

Purpose” Zuckerberg says, “is that feeling that you are a part of something bigger than yourself, that you are needed and that you have soemthing better ahead to work for.  Purpose is what creates true happiness.”

Zuckerberg outlines three ways to create a world where everyone has a sense of purpose:

  1. by taking on big meaningful projects together
  2. by redefining equality so that everyone has the freedom to pursue their purpose
  3. by building community all across the world

Take the time to listen to his words.

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Having blogged a few times in recent weeks about fake news –  So … what are we doing about fake news? and an earlier post titled Evidence based journalism: WikiTRIBUNE I got a buzz reading last week’s Open Culture post: “Calling Bullshit” – which describes a College course designed by two professors at the University of Washington, Carl Bergstrom and Jevin West to combat bullshit in the information age.

Their comprehensive website “Calling Bullshit” gives a great rationale for introducing this course to college students.  A statement shared with students attending the first class highlights the most basic of reasons for establishing such a teaching course:

Have a listen to the first lecture and you’ll probably find yourself hooked!

The presentations – available on Youtube – are short, sharp and easy to watch and, say the two professors who developed the course, it is all there online for anyone to pick up and teach.  All they ask in return is acknowledgement of them as authors of the material and to let them know how the material is being used.

Viewing this series of 10 sessions would make a great professional learning opportunity for any of us working in education.

Most particularly for teacher librarians, viewing this series could be an inspirational stepping stone to develop a course suited to students and would clearly be an extension of the CRAAP Test mentioned in my recent post.

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I came across a fabulous link the other day from Education Technology and Mobile Learning which is perfect for use with students by either English teachers or any of us working in school libraries.

The Digital Storytelling Wheel for Teachers post looks like one of those posts that will keep any teacher and their students busy for a very long time as they work their way through exploration of a huge range of iPad and Android Apps together with a host of Web tools.

I just love the graphic too!

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For years, teacher librarians have been teaching students not just how to run online searches but how important it is to authenticate information found.

But over the last 12-18 months with the preponderance of ‘fake news’ popping up not just on the internet but in usually reliable print publications such as newspapers and journals, the impact ‘fake news’ has had on our world has been the subject of much discussion around the globe.

So it is refreshing to see that the conversation has now started to shift from how dangerous fake news is to how to spot and combat fake news.

Perhaps under threat from mega million law suits, Facebook has been one of the first to take a lead by informing users of some basic tips on how to spot false news.

For a few brief days in mid April this year, Facebook users in just 14 countries got to see this alert:

from where they could read through the following concise and useful tips on how to spot false news:

Why only 14 countries were included in this roll out and why the alert was only live for a few days is a complete mystery.  Given the value this kind of shared information can have in the fight against the spread of misleading and false information, one can only hope that Facebook was testing the ground and will come back to making this a permanent alert available to global Facebook users.

As reported by engadget recently, Google also is attempting to stamp out the spread of fake news by inserting a ‘Fact check by’ tag on searches on contentious issues.

Another interesting development this week is the announcement by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.

WikiTRIBUNE is being developed as a new kind of news platform.  By calling on the community to work hand-in-hand with journalists, the aim is to verify and edit facts before they appear online.  Using crowdfunding to hire 14 journalists, it is intended that WikiTRIBUNE, like Wikipedia, will be free to access.

WikiTRIBUNE is set to differ from other news outlets in four specific ways:

  • the news source will be clearly stated
  • access to WikiTRIBUNE will be free and ad free
  • contributors from both the community and journalists will be equals
  • to achieve full transparency donors will be informed where money goes

Read more about the purpose and nature of WikiTRIBUNE in this excellent engadget article Wikipedia co-founder launches Wikitribune to fight fake news or listen to Jimmy Wales himself as he invites the world to come on board.

 

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I love it when I find confirmation of what I truly believe!

We’re never too old to learn!

Late last year a news article reported on research confirming that those over 50 have the ability to adapt to new jobs and their technology demands.

The survey of 5973 Australians aged 18 and over, conducted by Lonergan Research on behalf of insurance company Apia, found 77 per cent of people over 50 believe their creativity levels increase or stay the same with age.

The study found more than half (56 per cent) of people over 50 believe they can keep up with the latest trends in technology until at least the age of 80 …..”

80% of the third of Australians over the age of 50 are Baby Boomers, with the vast majority being technology literate and keen to learn and adjust to accommodate our rapidly changing world.  For so many, staying in contact with family and friends overseas via email, sharing photos online are a given.  So too are online shopping, banking and holiday planning.

Yet sadly, this article highlights the very real issue of age discrimination as demonstrated by employers who have a  reluctance to invest time retraining those who may have a limited number of years left in the labour market.  In short, this is a terrible loss for both prospective employers and employees, for business and for society as a whole.

Overcoming the stereotype that older workers take longer to learn new skills and are less technology savvy is a challenge that needs to be tackled.

A poke around the Australian Human Rights Commission: Age Discrimination website makes for some interesting reading as does an easy to read pdf titled: Willing to Work: National Inquiry into Employment Discrimination Against Older Australians and Australians with Disability which summaries the findings of a report undertaken by the Age and Disability Discrimination Commissioner.  Some of the conclusions reported upon can be read in the Commissioner’s foreward

The Inquiry found that too many people are shut out of work because of underlying assumptions, stereotypes or myths associated with their age or their disability. These beliefs lead to discriminatory behaviours during recruitment, in the workplace and in decisions about training, promotion and retirement, voluntary and involuntary. The cost and impact of this is high, for individuals and for our economy.

People who are willing to work but are denied the opportunity are also denied the personal and social benefits—of dignity, independence, a sense of purpose and the social connectedness—that work brings.

Discrimination has an impact on the health of individuals, their career and job opportunities, their financial situation and their families……

It also has consequences for workplaces. These include higher absenteeism, lower or lost productivity, higher staff turnover and increased recruitment costs, as well as lost business opportunities from abandoning experience and corporate knowledge…..”

It is because I constantly see the skills, talents and capabilities of older workers on a day-to-day basis that I find I am passionate about the need for society to recognize the value that older employees have to contribute to the work force. My passionate belief in the value of ongoing lifelong learning supports this stand.

Throughout my career, as I’ve stepped from job to job, I’ve found myself appreciating anew the power of the multigenerational staff with whom I work.  Indeed, as I penned some time ago: Older teachers rock!

Young employees have an unabashed enthusiasm for their work and a keenness to learn and experiment while older employees have a wealth of experience and foresight and a willingness to share and mentor.

The blend of the two is powerful beyond words!

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